• Issue
    Volume 90, Issue 11
    2471-2719
    November 2021

COVER PICTURE AND ISSUE INFORMATION

Free Access

Cover Picture and Issue Information

  • Pages: 2471-2473
  • First Published: 03 November 2021
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Cover image: Research in long-term exclosure experiments shows that, in African savannas, megaherbivores like this elephant can affect the habitat use of smaller wild herbivores by reducing tree cover. See pp. 2510–2522. Photo credit: Heather Wall.

RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS

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On the importance of accounting for alternative foraging tactics when assessing cognitive performance in wild animals

  • Pages: 2474-2477
  • First Published: 03 November 2021
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This Research Highlight focuses on the work of Reichert et al. (2021), who showcased the importance of considering alternative foraging strategies such as scrounging (exploitation of another individual's resources) when designing experiments that evaluate the cognitive abilities of individuals in the wild.

RESEARCH METHODS GUIDE

Open Access

Conceptualizing and quantifying body condition using structural equation modelling: A user guide

  • Pages: 2478-2496
  • First Published: 26 August 2021
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Structural equation modelling (SEM) is a powerful and flexible statistical tool that can lead to models of higher predictive power and with more accurate as well as precise estimates compared to conventional approaches. The authors encourage researchers to consider SEM as a flexible framework to quantify the multivariate nature of body condition and thus understand how it affects biological processes.

RESEARCH ARTICLES

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Cognition and covariance in the producer–scrounger game

  • Pages: 2497-2509
  • First Published: 05 June 2021
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Individual birds can learn to scrounge better, and this might affect how they learn to find food on their own.

Open Access

Experimental evidence that effects of megaherbivores on mesoherbivore space use are influenced by species' traits

  • Pages: 2510-2522
  • First Published: 30 June 2021
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Megaherbivore (re)introductions have been proposed as a means to restore lost ecosystem functions associated with megafaunal extinctions. However, the effects of megaherbivores on smaller herbivores are poorly understood. Long-term exclosure experiments reveal that megaherbivores generally suppress other herbivores in ways that are influenced by species' traits such as height.

Open Access

‘Keeping the kids at home’ can limit the persistence of contagious pathogens in social animals

  • Pages: 2523-2535
  • First Published: 12 June 2021
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Using a spatially implicit individual-based susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model, the authors show that in host populations where juveniles are isolated from contact with individuals in other social groups, the transmission and persistence of contagious pathogens is reduced. The likely mechanism is the formation, in social groups, of protective barriers composed of recovered adults around the new generations of susceptible juveniles.

Free Access

Interaction between warming and landscape foraging resource availability on solitary bee reproduction

  • Pages: 2536-2546
  • First Published: 18 June 2021
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Although solitary bees constitute about 90% of bee species and play an essential role in the pollination of wild plants and crops, the interactive effects of global change components such as landscape transformation or climate change have been little explored on them. The authors show temperature and resource availability synergistically affect solitary bees offspring quantity and quality.

Free Access

Effects of climate-change-driven gradual and acute temperature changes on shark and ray species

  • Pages: 2547-2559
  • First Published: 19 June 2021
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Climate change is impacting all marine species, but thus far little is known about how shark and ray species respond to gradual and acute temperature changes. The authors show that observations of large mobile species including scalloped hammerhead sharks and Mobula rays declined substantially at higher temperatures.

Free Access

Lifetime movement history is associated with variable growth of a potamodromous freshwater fish

  • Pages: 2560-2572
  • First Published: 23 June 2021
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This study is innovative in its use of several emerging techniques, including growth chronologies and otolith microchemistry, at a very large spatial scale. It is also the first study that the authors are aware of that compares lifetime and annual influences on individual performance.

Open Access

It's a hard knock life for some: Heterogeneity in infection life history of salmonids influences parasite disease outcomes

  • Pages: 2573-2593
  • First Published: 24 June 2021
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Recently we have all become aware that different individuals react to disease in a different ways, resulting in diverse outcomes. This also happens underwater for aquatic wildlife in terms of how infection life-history influences the immune response and infection rates within a population and contributes to the spread and maintenance of disease.

Open Access

Birds of different morphs use slightly different strategies to achieve similar reproductive performance following heatwave exposure

  • Pages: 2594-2608
  • First Published: 30 June 2021
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Heatwaves are becoming more frequent and intense, which constitutes one of the main challenges animals are currently facing. The persistence of species depends on immediate effects but also on the capacity of animals to breed successfully. The authors examined intraspecific variation in response to heatwaves on subsequent reproduction.

Free Access

Spatial dynamics of pathogen transmission in communally roosting species: Impacts of changing habitats on bat-virus dynamics

  • Pages: 2609-2622
  • First Published: 30 June 2021
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The authors give compelling evidence that spatial structure and bat aggregation may be a missing piece in understanding infection dynamics and spillover risk from flying-fox roosts.

Free Access

Positive abundance–elevational range size relationship weakened from temperate to subtropical ecosystems

  • Pages: 2623-2636
  • First Published: 10 July 2021
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The positive abundance–elevational range size relationship of birds gradually weakened from temperate to subtropical ecosystems in the Himalayas–Hengduan Mountains of China, adding to a growing body of evidence suggesting that abundance–elevational range size tracks a temperate to (sub)tropical ecotone, and can transition across ecotones where faunas of different evolutionary origins converge.

Open Access

Behavioural change during dispersal and its relationship to survival and reproduction in a cooperative breeder

  • Pages: 2637-2650
  • First Published: 14 July 2021
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The authors shed some light on the behavioural and physiological mechanisms by which dispersers may reduce mortality and maximise direct reproductive output paving the way towards a complete mechanistic and conceptual understanding of the dispersal process in cooperative breeders and its broader implications for population dynamics.

Open Access

Predicting the competitive interactions and trophic niche consequences of a globally invasive fish with threatened native species

  • Pages: 2651-2662
  • First Published: 26 July 2021
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This work tests hypotheses on how alien species integrate into native food webs and interact with threatened native species. The authors revealed that the alien common carp became increasingly generalist in their diet over time as they integrated into the food web, with strong trophic niche partitioning with the threatened crucian carp.

Open Access

The elephant in the family: Costs and benefits of elder siblings on younger offspring life-history trajectory in a matrilineal mammal

  • Pages: 2663-2677
  • First Published: 20 September 2021
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The authors explore the costs and benefits of sibling effects on calf life-history trajectory in Asian elephants. The long-term intragenerational consequences resulting from these effects remain still understudied, especially in long-lived animals.

Open Access

Longitudinal variation in the nutritional quality of basal food sources and its effect on invertebrates and fish in subalpine rivers

  • Pages: 2678-2691
  • First Published: 06 August 2021
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The results confirm that stream consumers derive their essential fatty acids from periphyton, which is irrespective of the functional feeding modes of consumers and despite marked longitudinal differences in terrestrial litter inputs or riparian shading.

Free Access

Synchrony erodes spatial portfolios of an anadromous fish and alters availability for resource users

  • Pages: 2692-2703
  • First Published: 22 September 2021
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This paper provides one of the first examples of a spatial portfolio effect applied at a scale relevant to predators and fisheries. The study demonstrates the value and applicability of understanding how environmental conditions influence spatially structured population dynamics.

Open Access

The evolution of size-dependent competitive interactions promotes species coexistence

  • Pages: 2704-2717
  • First Published: 13 August 2021
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Do size-structured interactions influence species coexistence? Theory suggests that they do, but this question remains a major empirical challenge. By coupling theoretical models with experimental data, the authors show that size-based competitive asymmetries play a crucial role in the evolution of species coexistence and the formation of new communities

CORRIGENDUM

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Corrigendum

  • Pages: 2718-2719
  • First Published: 08 October 2021